12 Ways to Assist your Child's Therapy

Parent's Part in Child Therapy

Parents often find it difficult to deal with some behaviors of their children. After trying out various ways, they may decide to see a professional like a child therapist or a psychologist. Children are brought in the therapy room. Parents share their difficulty about their child & want a solution to it. There is an expectation that the therapist would "fix" the child, & that the parents would have their solution.

However, this isn't how it works. Parents are an extremely important aspect of the child's therapy & treatment. Parents are an essential support system & have played a role in the foundation of the child's being. Hence, parents' role in their child's therapy for their child's treatment is very important!

Here are 12 ways that as a parent, you could assist in your child's therapy process:

  • Have an optimistic attitude & confidence towards the treatment & the therapist who is working with your child.
  • Help the other family members to understand the importance of their support for your child. Avoid teasing or discouraging the child for being in counseling.
  • Express to your child that you believe in his/her ability to effectively cope & build his/her confidence. Avoid sympathising with your child & viewing him/her as a victim.
  • Let your child know that he/she can be honest with the therapist. Due to family secrets, children tend to hold on to their emotions & thoughts. This can affect the child & the treatment greatly.
  • Keep away from asking your child about the details of the therapy session.
  • Be prepared & available to listen when child wants to converse.

  • Parents are an extremely important aspect of the child's therapy & treatment. Parents are an essential support system & have played a role in the foundation of the child's being.

  • Whenever child's therapist invites you to be part of your child's counseling sessions, be open to it. There might be certain changes required on the parents' part for a successful treatment.
  • If there are any tests that are asked to do for your child, get them done as they are part of the child's evaluation.
  • Sustain coping techniques the therapist teaches your child. Avoid being cynical even if you have doubts about the techniques. Encourage & help your child practice the techniques to strengthen his/her stabilization.
  • Ask any doubts or questions you have about your child's treatment. You have a complete right to know why the therapist is doing what he/she is doing.
  • Whatever is explained or asked to read more about, do the homework, as, it is vital for the child's treatment.
  • Anywhere you feel that it is unethical or it may be damaging the child than helping the child, speak to the therapist & end the therapy process.